Tuning
A musical scale or tuning scale of a piano is the assortment of pitches to which the strings are tuned.  We Tune orally which allows us to “set” the octave temperament, a defined table of frequencies, to best address the unique inharmonicity of each piano.
We recommend tuning your piano a minimum of twice a year to best maintain concert pitch and uniformity of unisons within each register.  Additionally, seasonal changes affect various components of the piano.  One example is the crown of the soundboard where the wood may swell and increased pressure is put on the strings causing the piano to go sharp.  Conversely, when drying occurs, pianos are likely to go flat.
Regulation
The Piano design is unique among keyboard instruments. Only the piano has hammers that strike tuned strings and rebound away from them, allowing the strings to vibrate and produce sustained musical tones. Each note has an escapement mechanism between the key and its hammer that releases the hammer to strike and to bounce away from the string.Each time a key is depressed a whole series of events occur. These events occur in a specific order and within predefined parameters: the key is depressed; the hammer moves a specified distance while the damper is lifted from the string; the jack trips from under the hammer butt; the hammer rebounds and is caught by the backcheck.All of these movements in a piano are adjustable and must be regulated for proper operation.Regulating a piano involves the careful adjustment of these parts so each does exactly what it should at exactly the right time.Pianos require regulation because felt cloth and buckskin cushions become packed down and hammers wear from use and form grooved string patterns. Additionally, wooden parts warp and change the relationship of one part to another.A properly regulated piano is essential for a pianist at all levels to be able to play softly and loudly by depressing the key slowly or quickly thus varying the intensity of the blow of the hammer on the string.
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